Monthly Archives: March 2017

The points of TCP retransmission you must know (1)

Published / by Chen Ye / 5 Comments on The points of TCP retransmission you must know (1)

 

TCP retransmission is a mechanism to ensure the data integrity and completeness especially in the bad network environment.

 

Binary Exponential backoff:

A simple example of TCP’s timeout and retransmission mechanism. The first retransmit occurs at time 42.954, followed by other retransmissions at times 43.374, 44.215, 45.895, and 49.255. The intervals between successive retransmissions are 206ms, 420ms, 841ms, 1.68s, and 3.36s, respectively. These times represent a doubling of the timeout between successive retransmissions of the same segment. This doubling of time between successive retransmissions is called a “binary exponential backoff”, If we measure the elapsed time between the initial request and the time at which the connection is finally aborted, the total time is about 15.5 minutes. After that, we will get the error message.

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What is fast retransmission?

Published / by Chen Ye / 9 Comments on What is fast retransmission?

 

The difference between fast retransmission and retransmission:

Fast retransmit [RFC5681] is a TCP procedure that can induce a packet retransmission based on feedback from the receiver instead of requiring a retransmission timer to expire. As a result, packet loss can often be more quickly and efficiently repaired using fast retransmit than with timer-based retransmission. A typical TCP implements both fast retransmit and timer-based retransmission. Before we describe fast retransmit in more detail, it is important to realize that TCP is required to generate an immediate acknowledgment (a “duplicate ACK”) when an out-of-order segment is

Before we describe fast retransmit in more detail, it is important to realize that TCP is required to generate an immediate acknowledgment (a “duplicate ACK”) when an out-of-order segment is received, and that the loss of a segment implies out-of-order arrivals at the receiver when subsequent data arrives. When this happens, a hole is created at the receiver. The sender’s job then becomes filling the receiver’s holes as quickly and efficiently as possible.

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What is duplicate packets?

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Although rare, the IP protocol may deliver a single packet more than one time. This can happen, for example, when a link-layer network protocol performs a retransmission and creates two copies of the same packet. When duplicates are created, TCP can become confused in some of the ways we have seen already. Consider the case shown in following figure in which packet number 3 has been duplicated three times.

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